Health  

Amuwo Odofin clinic intensifies drive to reduce mother, infant deaths

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A visit to the Amuwo Odofin Maternal and Child Centre has raised hopes that Nigeria can still get it right in terms of sustainable healthcare delivery and universal healthcare coverage.

The secondary healthcare seen in Amumo Odofin, which is meant to address maternal and child health has been living up to expectations as the patients testify to the quality and affordable delivery been given. A patient who confided with The Guardian, said: “I gave birth to my first child here in 2014, believe me the services is very commendable, though we are all humans. All you have to do as a pregnant woman is just to register with the sum of N15 000 or thereabout and you can come in anytime for your ante natal care. Prior to your delivery, a little amount is required and you will be taken care of properly. As you can see law and order is here. I lost my card since 2015 and am here to get it back. If this is coming from the government, I think in the near future we are going to get it right.”

Meanwhile another expectant mother commended the establishment boasting of how the price was slashed from N20, 000 to N15, 000. Reacting to the long queue, she said that today being the antenatal day, population is expected to be much but everyone will be attended to. A worker who pleaded anonymity said that the establishment is superb, that the number of enrolees is on the increase. Her words: “People always come to back to us because of how we treat our patients, this is one of the best places you can get a quality care as an expectant mother and I urge you to bring your wife.”

The World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) target to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100 000 births, with no country having a maternal mortality rate of more than twice the global average. Statistics show that approximately 830 women die daily from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth and 99 per cent of all maternal deaths occur in developing countries especially in women living in rural areas and among poorer communities.

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