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Daily aspirin could stop cancer by shutting down blood clot enzyme

By Chukwuma Muanya, Assistant Editor   |   13 February 2017   |   1:54 am

Taking aspirin straight after a ‘funny turn’ could slash the risk of suffering a major stroke PHOTO CREDIT: google.com/search

It has already been credited with helping to reduce heart attack risk, but now it seems that daily doses of aspirin could also help tackle cancer.

New research from Texas, United States (U.S.), suggests the pain-relief medication’s interaction with blood cells could stop tumors from growing.

The findings, which were published in the February 2017 issue of Cancer Prevention Research, offers fresh scope for future treatment possibilities.

Specifically, it notes that how the drug’s response to platelets – the blood’s clotting agent – may assist oncology patients.

Academics commissioned by Veterans Affairs Research found the way aspirin disrupts the normal clotting process can deprive the malignant masses from expanding.

Their lab tests showed it works by shutting down the enzyme COX-1, thereby curbing the number of circulating platelets and their level of activity.

Some of the experiments used regular aspirin from a local drug store. In another phase, the researchers used a special preparation of aspirin combined with phosphatidylcholine, a type of lipid, or fat molecule.


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