Africa  

Former Congolese VP guilty of war crimes

(FILES) This file photo taken on September 29, 2015 shows former vice-president in the transitional government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo looking on in a court room of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to stand trial on charges including corruptly influencing witnesses by giving them money and instructions to provide false testimony, and presenting false evidence, at The Hague, the Netherlands. War crimes judges deliver their verdict on March 21, 2016 against former Congolese vice president Jean-Pierre Bemba, blamed for unbridled rapes and killings by his private army in neighbouring Central African Republic over a decade ago. / AFP / POOL / PETER DEJONG

(FILES) This file photo taken on September 29, 2015 shows former vice-president in the transitional government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo looking on in a court room of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to stand trial on charges including corruptly influencing witnesses by giving them money and instructions to provide false testimony, and presenting false evidence, at The Hague, the Netherlands.<br />War crimes judges deliver their verdict on March 21, 2016 against former Congolese vice president Jean-Pierre Bemba, blamed for unbridled rapes and killings by his private army in neighbouring Central African Republic over a decade ago. / AFP / POOL / PETER DEJONG

The International Criminal Court (ICC) has found former Congolese vice president, Jean-Pierre Bemba, guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in Central African Republic (CAR) more than a decade ago.

The verdicts announced yesterday focused on the responsibility of a military commander for the actions of his troops, as Bemba was accused of commanding a militia that went on a spree of murder, rape and pillage.

The charges – two of crimes against humanity and three of war crimes – stem from his private army’s intervention on the side of CAR’s then-president Ange-Felix Patasse in the neighbouring country’s civil war.

Bemba’s long-running trial was the first at the ICC to feature allegations of systematic sexual abuse by soldiers in a conflict.

Al Jazeera, reporting from The Hague, said the ICC’s ruling was historic in several ways.

“Bemba is not only the most senior political leader ever to have been brought to judgment here at the International Criminal Court at The Hague, but what makes this particular case a landmark ruling is the fact that it has put rape as a weapon of war,” Brennan said.

Human rights activists welcomed the conviction.

Descartes Mponge, secretary general of Congolese rights group, ACADHOSHA, said the judgment “strengthens the ICC’s credibility in Africa where it is accused of bias and politicisation”.

Bemba is a wealthy businessman, whose Movement for the Liberation of Congo (MLC) militia and political party, vied for dominance in the country in the early 2000s.

Summing up the case against Bemba in November 2014, prosecution lawyer Horejah Bala-Gaye told judges that Bemba’s forces “raped their victims at gunpoint anywhere and at any time”.

Bemba’s lawyers told judges in their closing arguments that there was insufficient evidence to convict him of murder, rape and pillage.

The ICC’s prosecutors said Bemba knew, or should have known, that his MLC soldiers were committing crimes.

During the five-year trial, 40 witnesses testified. One described being raped by two MLC soldiers. She was later diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.

Bemba’s lawyers said that he had no control over the MLC’s campaign in CAR, during which they claim its soldiers were fully under Patasse’s command.

His arrest in 2008 came as a surprise both to Bemba and his supporters and opponents at home. He had been living in semi-exile in Europe for several years when prosecutors sprung a trap by issuing an arrest warrant during a visit to Belgium, Congo’s former colonial master.



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