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Hollande scraps post-attacks constitutional reform after opposition

French President Francois Hollande delivers a speech during a ceremony of commemoration for the end of the Algeria war in Paris on March 19, 2016.  Hollande defended his choice to commemorate the cease-fire of March 19, 1962 in Algeria to honor the victims of this conflict by explaining that this date marked "not yet peace" but "the beginning of the outcome the war". The presidential initiative was disputed by many associations of veterans and Pieds-noir for whom this date does not mark the end of the Algerian conflict but the beginning of the exile and massacre of civilians and harkis. / AFP / POOL / Christophe Petit Tesson

French President Francois Hollande delivers a speech during a ceremony of commemoration for the end of the Algeria war in Paris on March 19, 2016.<br />Hollande defended his choice to commemorate the cease-fire of March 19, 1962 in Algeria to honor the victims of this conflict by explaining that this date marked “not yet peace” but “the beginning of the outcome the war”. The presidential initiative was disputed by many associations of veterans and Pieds-noir for whom this date does not mark the end of the Algerian conflict but the beginning of the exile and massacre of civilians and harkis. / AFP / POOL / Christophe Petit Tesson

French President Francois Hollande said Wednesday he was scrapping his plan for constitutional reforms in the wake of the November 13 attacks on Paris, including a measure to strip convicted terrorists of their nationality.

Hollande announced in a televised statement he was “closing the constitutional debate” on the reforms after the lower house, the National Assembly, and opposition-dominated Senate failed to agree on the text.

Hollande proposed the reforms after Islamic State group suicide bombers and gunmen killed 130 people across Paris.

“A compromise appears out of reach on the stripping of terrorists’ nationality,” Hollande said.

“I also note that a section of the opposition is hostile to any constitutional revision. I deeply regret this attitude.

Hollande pledged that despite dropping the reform plans, he would not “deviate from the commitments I have taken… to ensure the security of our country.”



1 Comment
  • Dr. Jegede, Ajibade Ebenezer

    The stance of the opposition is to make Hollande’s government unpopular. It is hard to believe that people that were thought to be reasonable in that they are termed white may often be evaluated unreasonable. Instead of teaming up to ward off evil consistently posed to lives and property on French soil, party bickering and selfish agenda dominated the discussion on reform. This is not only unfortunate but quite inhuman. There should be a rethink in this regard.

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