New study says impact of climate change could kill over

PHOTO: www.youtube.com

PHOTO: www.youtube.com

The verdict on climate change’s effect on agriculture, health and mortality is out: It could kill over 500,000 people in 2050, to cause increase deaths due to heart disease, stroke and cancer and the resultant reduced fruit and vegetable intake will be responsible for twice as many deaths as under-nutrition.

The new modeling study was published in The Lancet.

The researchers say the study provides the strongest evidence yet of the damage that climate change could have on global food production and public health. They predict it will kill 500,000 extra people in 2050.

According to the study, one of the most important consequences of climate change could be its effect on agriculture. It is expected to reduce the quantity of food harvested, which could lead to higher food prices and reduced consumption.

The study found that climate change could alter agricultural production and regional food availability, which affects diet and body weight in a different way – by changing what people eat.

Imbalanced diets, not eating enough vegetables and fruits, eating too much red meat, being obese and overweight – these risk factors have already been linked to significant numbers of deaths worldwide.

The new study, which examines suggests by the middle of the century, reduced fruit and vegetable intake resulting from the effect of climate change on agriculture will be responsible for twice as many deaths as under-nutrition.

The researchers say the biggest effect will be felt in China and India, who will suffer three-quarters of all climate-related deaths due to altered food production.
Health effects of climate-induced changes in agricultural production

Study leader Dr. Marco Springmann, of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom (U.K.), said their model takes a different approach to examining the effect of climate change on food and health, and noted: “Much research has looked at food security, but little has focused on the wider health effects of agricultural production.”

He



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