Firm advocates investment in education, health to reduce poverty


A non-governmental organisation, Action Health Incorporated (AHI), has urged the Federal Government to invest more in citizen’s health and education to reduce poverty.

AHI made the call at the 25th anniversary of its annual Teenage Festival of Life (TFL), the themed, ‘Harnessing demographic dividends by investing in young people’ at the University of Lagos, Akoka Yaba.

Executive Director, Action Health Incorporated, Adenike Esiet said the sustenance of the festival, which had produced professionals in notable organisations was a fact that education and health were pivotal to growth and development in any country.

She said the theme of the festival was carefully chosen to reflect contemporary and social issues that young people can learn and speak about.

Esiet explained that favourable policymaking in the four pillars of health, economy, governance, and education will ensure that increasing population growth of the country amounts to positive gain.

Delivering the keynote address on the theme, country representative of United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Eugene Kongnyuy, who was represented by Head of Lagos Liaison Office, Omolasho Omosehin, said investment in children health and education is a sure way out of poverty.

While citing the report that said Nigeria was derailing in the world poverty index report, Kongnyuy said lack of quality education and proper healthcare delivery to children and citizens will amount to Nigeria being the permanent poverty headquarters globally.

He stated that the current paternal rate of 6-7 children per family in the family means danger looms in the future if investments in education and health are prioritised.

Also, the Director-General, Lagos State Office Education Quality Assurance, Ronke Soyombo urged young persons to desist hooliganism and other forms of nuisance, but embrace entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation to impact the society positively.

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