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Lift, Firm And Perk Up Your Cleavage

By Yvonne Ejiofor 18 October 2017   |   8:00 am

Seeing as its breast cancer awareness month, it is time to show our bossoms some love this month.

Developing your chest muscles isn’t a wild and crazy idea — in fact, working your “pecs” (aka pectoral muscles) if you’re a woman is smart.

It’s important to strengthen your chest for a number of reasons.

For starters, it helps keep your upper-body muscles in balance, which improves your posture. These two things decrease stress and tension on your muscles and bones, that makes you less injury-prone.

A strong chest also helps you do the things you need to do every day because those pec muscles add power to your shoulders and arms. It takes more than biceps to push up a heavy door, heft a heavy grocery bag or mow your lawn. You need the kind of upper-body oomph that comes from powerful chest muscles.

If you’re looking to add a little bulk to your bosom, it helps to build up those pec muscles, here are four simple exercises to get you started.

 

  1. Begin in a kneeling position on a mat with hands below shoulders and knees behind hips so back is angled and long.
  2. Tuck toes under, tighten abdominals and bend elbows to lower chest toward the floor. Keep your gaze in front of your fingertips so neck stays long.
  3. Press chest back up to start position.
  4. Repeat for desired number of repetitions.

Targets: shoulders, arm, core

  1. While holding a dumbbell in each hand, sit on a military press bench or utility bench that has back support. Place the dumbbells upright on top of your thighs.
  2. Now raise the dumbbells to shoulder height one at a time using your thighs to help propel them up into position.
  3. Make sure to rotate your wrists so that the palms of your hands are facing forward. This is your starting position.
  4. Now, exhale and push the dumbbells upward until they touch at the top.
  5. Then, after a brief pause at the top contracted position, slowly lower the weights back down to the starting position while inhaling.
  6. Repeat for the recommended amount of repetitions.

  1. Hold a dumbbell on each hand and lie on an incline bench that is set to an incline angle of no more than 30 degrees.
  2. Extend your arms above you with a slight bend at the elbows.
  3. Now rotate the wrists so that the palms of your hands are facing you. Tip: The pinky fingers should be next to each other. This will be your starting position.
  4. As you breathe in, start to slowly lower the arms to the side while keeping the arms extended and while rotating the wrists until the palms of the hand are facing each other. Tip: At the end of the movement the arms will be by your side with the palms facing the ceiling.
  5. As you exhale start to bring the dumbbells back up to the starting position by reversing the motion and rotating the hands so that the pinky fingers are next to each other again. Tip:Keep in mind that the movement will only happen at the shoulder joint and at the wrist. There is no motion that happens at the elbow joint.
  6. Repeat for the recommended amount of repetitions.

  1. Lie down on a flat bench with a dumbbell in each hand resting on top of your thighs. The palms of your hands will be facing each other.
  2. Then, using your thighs to help raise the dumbbells up, lift the dumbbells one at a time so that you can hold them in front of you at shoulder width.
  3. Once at shoulder width, rotate your wrists forward so that the palms of your hands are facing away from you. The dumbbells should be just to the sides of your chest, with your upper arm and forearm creating a 90 degree angle. Be sure to maintain full control of the dumbbells at all times. This will be your starting position.
  4. Then, as you breathe out, use your chest to push the dumbbells up. Lock your arms at the top of the lift and squeeze your chest, hold for a second and then begin coming down slowly. Tip: Ideally, lowering the weight should take about twice as long as raising it.
  5. Repeat the movement for the prescribed amount of repetitions of your training program.


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